tripadvisorlogo
 

Dolphin Tales

It’s Orca season! We’ve had Orca sightings in the bay a few times in the last couple of weeks, and we always get the same question – do Orcas eat humans? The answer is NO! There is no record of humans ever being attacked by Orca in the wild. Here are some Orca facts….
 

Orca, also known as Killer Whales, are actually part of the dolphin family! The name killer whale comes from old fishermen referring to them as ‘whale killer’, after observing their hunting behaviour. Orca in Antarctica sometimes hunt and eat juvenile whales, along with small sharks, octopus, fish, squid… They aren’t picky! Orca around New Zealand love sting rays, which is why we often see them come right in to the harbour and Pilot Bay to hunt them!

 

There are around 150-200 Orca that live around New Zealand. They can each be identified by the shape of their pectoral fin (the big fin on their back) and the shape and brightness of the white marks behind their eyes and on their back. Males have a very long, straight dorsal fin, sometimes as long as 5ft, and females have a smaller, curved fin.  The males can grow up to 9 meters in length! But it’s the females that live the longest, living to about 90 years old. The oldest Orca ever recorded lived to 104 years old.

 

Orca are highly intelligent, and like other dolphins they communicate with each other using clicks and whistles, and hunt using echolocation. This is really helpful in dark deeper waters, or murky shallow water. They can also tell what kind of prey it is, and whether it is a human or a seal! So there really is no need to be afraid of Orcas.. They are just big playful dolphins!

Email me when new posts are made to this blog

Great news for Dolphin Conservation!

Written by Dolphin Queen on November 12th, 2014.      0 comments

The Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) has recently agreed that the culture of Whales and Dolphins should be taken into account when discussing conservation measures in the future.

Culture was once thought to be a trait that was unique to humans, however in the last 15 years culture in non-human primates such as chimps, and more recently cetaceans such as Dolphins and Orca has been observed and finally recognised.
Culture in animals doesn’t mean art galleries, or clothing or anything you might initially think of when the word Culture comes to mind. Instead, it is defined by the passing on of learned behaviours between individuals in the same group, and culture in Dolphin societies was finally recognised in Australia in 2005, with a group of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins teaching their young to use pieces of marine sponge to protect their snouts whilst foraging. Groups of Orca that live in the same area as other groups may have very different food preferences and vocalisations, and teach these to their young, much like a village community teaching their children their customs.

Taking this culture into account is a fantastic step forward and means that instead of just using the location these amazing creatures are found and their family genetic links, conservation approaches will look into their culture, how they behave as individuals and as groups as this may affect their responses to threats and  environmental change.
We at Dolphin Seafaris love watching the behaviour of the dolphins we see, we often recognise individuals year on year and enjoy watching them teach their young and pass on their culture. For more about what we’ve been seeing recently, check out Facebook and give us a like!

Even better, to join us on one of our trips to experience these fascinating creatures up close and in their natural environment where their culture is allowed to thrive, call us on 07577 0105 , or email bookings@nzdolphin.com
 

Comments

Email me when new posts are made to this blog

Great news for Dolphin Conservation!

Written by Dolphin Queen on November 12th, 2014.      0 comments

The Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) has recently agreed that the culture of Whales and Dolphins should be taken into account when discussing conservation measures in the future.

Culture was once thought to be a trait that was unique to humans, however in the last 15 years culture in non-human primates such as chimps, and more recently cetaceans such as Dolphins and Orca has been observed and finally recognised.
Culture in animals doesn’t mean art galleries, or clothing or anything you might initially think of when the word Culture comes to mind. Instead, it is defined by the passing on of learned behaviours between individuals in the same group, and culture in Dolphin societies was finally recognised in Australia in 2005, with a group of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins teaching their young to use pieces of marine sponge to protect their snouts whilst foraging. Groups of Orca that live in the same area as other groups may have very different food preferences and vocalisations, and teach these to their young, much like a village community teaching their children their customs.

Taking this culture into account is a fantastic step forward and means that instead of just using the location these amazing creatures are found and their family genetic links, conservation approaches will look into their culture, how they behave as individuals and as groups as this may affect their responses to threats and  environmental change.
We at Dolphin Seafaris love watching the behaviour of the dolphins we see, we often recognise individuals year on year and enjoy watching them teach their young and pass on their culture. For more about what we’ve been seeing recently, check out Facebook and give us a like!

Even better, to join us on one of our trips to experience these fascinating creatures up close and in their natural environment where their culture is allowed to thrive, call us on 07577 0105 , or email bookings@nzdolphin.com
 

Comments

Email me when new posts are made to this blog

Great news for Dolphin Conservation!

Written by Dolphin Queen on November 12th, 2014.      0 comments

The Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) has recently agreed that the culture of Whales and Dolphins should be taken into account when discussing conservation measures in the future.

Culture was once thought to be a trait that was unique to humans, however in the last 15 years culture in non-human primates such as chimps, and more recently cetaceans such as Dolphins and Orca has been observed and finally recognised.
Culture in animals doesn’t mean art galleries, or clothing or anything you might initially think of when the word Culture comes to mind. Instead, it is defined by the passing on of learned behaviours between individuals in the same group, and culture in Dolphin societies was finally recognised in Australia in 2005, with a group of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins teaching their young to use pieces of marine sponge to protect their snouts whilst foraging. Groups of Orca that live in the same area as other groups may have very different food preferences and vocalisations, and teach these to their young, much like a village community teaching their children their customs.

Taking this culture into account is a fantastic step forward and means that instead of just using the location these amazing creatures are found and their family genetic links, conservation approaches will look into their culture, how they behave as individuals and as groups as this may affect their responses to threats and  environmental change.
We at Dolphin Seafaris love watching the behaviour of the dolphins we see, we often recognise individuals year on year and enjoy watching them teach their young and pass on their culture. For more about what we’ve been seeing recently, check out Facebook and give us a like!

Even better, to join us on one of our trips to experience these fascinating creatures up close and in their natural environment where their culture is allowed to thrive, call us on 07577 0105 , or email bookings@nzdolphin.com
 

Comments

Email me when new posts are made to this blog

Great news for Dolphin Conservation!

Written by Dolphin Queen on November 12th, 2014.      0 comments

The Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) has recently agreed that the culture of Whales and Dolphins should be taken into account when discussing conservation measures in the future.

Culture was once thought to be a trait that was unique to humans, however in the last 15 years culture in non-human primates such as chimps, and more recently cetaceans such as Dolphins and Orca has been observed and finally recognised.
Culture in animals doesn’t mean art galleries, or clothing or anything you might initially think of when the word Culture comes to mind. Instead, it is defined by the passing on of learned behaviours between individuals in the same group, and culture in Dolphin societies was finally recognised in Australia in 2005, with a group of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins teaching their young to use pieces of marine sponge to protect their snouts whilst foraging. Groups of Orca that live in the same area as other groups may have very different food preferences and vocalisations, and teach these to their young, much like a village community teaching their children their customs.

Taking this culture into account is a fantastic step forward and means that instead of just using the location these amazing creatures are found and their family genetic links, conservation approaches will look into their culture, how they behave as individuals and as groups as this may affect their responses to threats and  environmental change.
We at Dolphin Seafaris love watching the behaviour of the dolphins we see, we often recognise individuals year on year and enjoy watching them teach their young and pass on their culture. For more about what we’ve been seeing recently, check out Facebook and give us a like!

Even better, to join us on one of our trips to experience these fascinating creatures up close and in their natural environment where their culture is allowed to thrive, call us on 07577 0105 , or email bookings@nzdolphin.com
 

Comments

About Dolphin Seafaris

We are a passionate team who love all marine life, especially dolphins, and enjoy educating our customers about dolphins and marine life. With many years of working with marine animals and a high success rate of locating dolphins, Dolphin Seafaris will give you the dolphin tour of a life time. 

Read more
 

Contact Us

0800 ECO TRIP 
(0800 326 8747)

0064 7 577 0105
bookings@nzdolphin.com