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Dolphin Tales

It’s Orca season! We’ve had Orca sightings in the bay a few times in the last couple of weeks, and we always get the same question – do Orcas eat humans? The answer is NO! There is no record of humans ever being attacked by Orca in the wild. Here are some Orca facts….
 

Orca, also known as Killer Whales, are actually part of the dolphin family! The name killer whale comes from old fishermen referring to them as ‘whale killer’, after observing their hunting behaviour. Orca in Antarctica sometimes hunt and eat juvenile whales, along with small sharks, octopus, fish, squid… They aren’t picky! Orca around New Zealand love sting rays, which is why we often see them come right in to the harbour and Pilot Bay to hunt them!

 

There are around 150-200 Orca that live around New Zealand. They can each be identified by the shape of their pectoral fin (the big fin on their back) and the shape and brightness of the white marks behind their eyes and on their back. Males have a very long, straight dorsal fin, sometimes as long as 5ft, and females have a smaller, curved fin.  The males can grow up to 9 meters in length! But it’s the females that live the longest, living to about 90 years old. The oldest Orca ever recorded lived to 104 years old.

 

Orca are highly intelligent, and like other dolphins they communicate with each other using clicks and whistles, and hunt using echolocation. This is really helpful in dark deeper waters, or murky shallow water. They can also tell what kind of prey it is, and whether it is a human or a seal! So there really is no need to be afraid of Orcas.. They are just big playful dolphins!

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Grey-faced Petrel, Oi

Written by Dolphin Queen on October 12th, 2015.      0 comments

The grey-faced petrel or oi is one of the most common petrels we see at Dolphin Seafaris. They cut a striking image as the fly by our vessel. As one of the larger petrel species they are easy to recognise with glossy black feathers and a white dusting around the black hooked beak.
They are such a peaceful bird and we often see them napping out in the ocean bobbing on the waves. They breed on local islands and return at night to feed their chick a yummy seafood smoothie of primarily squid. Some chicks are culturally harvested while they are still plump in their burrow. these are known as mutton birds. Once chicks fledge they will return at the same nesting spot they fledged from to breed. 
 
 

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Email me when new posts are made to this blog

Grey-faced Petrel, Oi

Written by Dolphin Queen on October 12th, 2015.      0 comments

The grey-faced petrel or oi is one of the most common petrels we see at Dolphin Seafaris. They cut a striking image as the fly by our vessel. As one of the larger petrel species they are easy to recognise with glossy black feathers and a white dusting around the black hooked beak.
They are such a peaceful bird and we often see them napping out in the ocean bobbing on the waves. They breed on local islands and return at night to feed their chick a yummy seafood smoothie of primarily squid. Some chicks are culturally harvested while they are still plump in their burrow. these are known as mutton birds. Once chicks fledge they will return at the same nesting spot they fledged from to breed. 
 
 

Comments

Email me when new posts are made to this blog

Grey-faced Petrel, Oi

Written by Dolphin Queen on October 12th, 2015.      0 comments

The grey-faced petrel or oi is one of the most common petrels we see at Dolphin Seafaris. They cut a striking image as the fly by our vessel. As one of the larger petrel species they are easy to recognise with glossy black feathers and a white dusting around the black hooked beak.
They are such a peaceful bird and we often see them napping out in the ocean bobbing on the waves. They breed on local islands and return at night to feed their chick a yummy seafood smoothie of primarily squid. Some chicks are culturally harvested while they are still plump in their burrow. these are known as mutton birds. Once chicks fledge they will return at the same nesting spot they fledged from to breed. 
 
 

Comments

Email me when new posts are made to this blog

Grey-faced Petrel, Oi

Written by Dolphin Queen on October 12th, 2015.      0 comments

The grey-faced petrel or oi is one of the most common petrels we see at Dolphin Seafaris. They cut a striking image as the fly by our vessel. As one of the larger petrel species they are easy to recognise with glossy black feathers and a white dusting around the black hooked beak.
They are such a peaceful bird and we often see them napping out in the ocean bobbing on the waves. They breed on local islands and return at night to feed their chick a yummy seafood smoothie of primarily squid. Some chicks are culturally harvested while they are still plump in their burrow. these are known as mutton birds. Once chicks fledge they will return at the same nesting spot they fledged from to breed. 
 
 

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About Dolphin Seafaris

We are a passionate team who love all marine life, especially dolphins, and enjoy educating our customers about dolphins and marine life. With many years of working with marine animals and a high success rate of locating dolphins, Dolphin Seafaris will give you the dolphin tour of a life time. 

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0800 ECO TRIP 
(0800 326 8747)

0064 7 577 0105
bookings@nzdolphin.com