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Shark Myth Buster!

Written by Shark Girl on February 9th, 2017.      0 comments

We’ve been lucky enough to spot a number of blue sharks and hammerhead sharks in the last few weeks, so we thought we’d do some myth busting and see if we can make you love sharks like we do!

 

Hammerhead sharks, easily distinguishable by their unusual shaped head, might look scary, but they are actually big scaredy cats. They have no interest in us, and are way more likely to be more scared of us than we are of them. There have been zero reports of an attack on a human by a hammerhead shark, because it is practically impossible! The upside down U-shape of their mouth and its position underneath it’s head means that it wouldn’t be able to bite, let alone eat a human. Hammerheads are particularly partial to squid, rays, small fish, and small crustaceans. They tend to eat creatures that are around on the bottom of the ocean, explaining their mouth shape and position!

 

The shape of their head also is a massive help in finding their prey – all sharks have an incredibly advanced electrosensory system, which they use to detect movements and location of prey, temperature changes in the ocean, and they even use it as a form of navigation. This system is made up of pores mainly on their head and face, so having this system spread out further across the hammer shaped head, they can use this to their advantage to find food in the ocean floor easier and quicker. Having their eyes further apart is also a huge advantage, they have much better vision than most other sharks. They have almost 360-degree vertical vision, although they do have a blind spot directly in front of them, which is why they move their head side to side so much when they swim.

 

Even though they like to feed in deeper waters, we often see hammerhead sharks cruising along the surface, or in shallower waters. It’s thought that this is so they can warm up in the sun and the warmer shallow water, as they are cold-blooded creatures so can’t warm themselves up like we can. So when we spot them from the boat, they are just enjoying a nice bit of sunbathing.

 

We have also seen lots of blue sharks in the last few weeks, a smaller relative of the hammerhead. Blue sharks are, as you can probably guess, are a beautiful blue colour, and they have a long, pointy nose.

 

They also eat squid, small fish and crustaceans, but are also scavengers – they often eat fleshy remains of other animals in the water.  They have serrated teeth, making it easier to chew through large chunks of flesh, such as a dead whale body. They are a pelagic species, meaning they are constantly on the move through the water, swimming fairly close to the surface and feeding in deeper water.

 

It’s long nose and long pectoral fins means the blue shark is a mean swimmer, they can cover huge distances with minimal effort. They are migratory species, constantly on the move from coast to coast, mostly in tropical waters, but in the summer they tend to venture to cooler waters, where we get to see these beauties around the bay!

For the love of sharks!

- Shark Girl

 

Bringing in the New Year!

Written by Dolphin S on January 17th, 2017.      0 comments

What a way to bring in the new year!

Super pods, Orca, Brydes whales, Sunfish, and even turtles!

We’ve had it all this month at Dolphin Seafaris and hopefully this streak of luck will continue for the rest of the season!

Summer has shifted into gear and we are having one of the best seasons yet with this beautiful weather and dolphins for days!

The dolphins are always a favourite for us on our trips, but we have been so blessed the past few weeks to have numerous encounters with the sunfish or otherwise known as the Mola mola! It is the heaviest bony fish species in the world and their diet primarily consists of jellyfish! These fish can be as tall as they are long and their body is laterally compressed, they are found in both tropical and temperate waters around the world.

Not only have we had these incredible strange looking fish, we’ve always been blessed with turtles! Can you believe it!

On numerous occasions we have also had the rare encounter with the gigantic Leatherback Turtle! They can be found worldwide and found as north as Canada and down south to New Zealand and South America. They are able to maintain their warm body temperature even in the more temperate conditions, which is why they are able to survive in the cooler waters we get here in New Zealand.

These turtles aren’t your usual hard shell turtles; hence the name leather back, they have a thick leathery skin and are one of the deepest diving marine animals out there reaching depths of up to 1,200m! These turtles, like the sunfish also feed on large jellyfish!

We are crossing our fingers and toes that this magnificent season continues with plentiful encounters with the dolphins and any other marine life that wishes to grace us with their presence!

Join us in 2017 while the sun is shining and the water is warm for the experience of a lifetime!

 

Dolphin S

 

Merry Christmas!

Written by Dolphin S on December 27th, 2016.      0 comments

Merry Christmas!
 
The Holiday period has kicked off in full swing! The Bay of Plenty has been putting on a show for all our guests the past few weeks with this stunning weather, calm seas and plentiful array of marine life!
Over past few weeks the Common Dolphins have been entertaining our guests with their surfing skills, jumping ability and sometimes mating displays!
We’ve had some amazing encounters with pods of dolphins, sometimes we’ve even had pods with up to 300 dolphins!
 
Not only that, our fantastic whale month of November has continued and we’ve been blessed to experience the Brydes Whale again recently!
 
And to top that off an early Christmas present to all our crew and guests, we had 8 Orca grace us with their presence recently. What an absolutely incredible experience that was!
The Orca are the largest member of the Dolphin family, and can weight up to 3,600kgs!
Orcas are highly social animals and usually travel in pods of 5-30. They are found in most oceans around the world but are most common in the Arctic and Antarctic waters.
They are toothed whales and will feed on birds, turtles, sharks, fish, seals and squid.
Orca found in New Zealand are quite unique to the rest of the worlds populations as they feed on stingrays and will often be seen inside the Harbour chasing stings rays into shore!

thumb IMG 1039 1024-714 

December has been a great month for viewing and swimming with dolphins and it shall continue through into the New Year!
 
What better way to end 2016, or go into 2017 then with an experience to never forget!
 
Come join us!
 
Dolphin S
 

Whales O' Plenty

Written by dolphin Finatic on November 29th, 2016.      0 comments

Whales O' Plenty

 

We have had an absolutely fantastic start to the season. Typically, November is a great month to view Whales and this November has been no exception. 90+% of the time we encounter the common dolphins however, 10-12% of the time we are blessed to see whales! Predominately throughout the season we see Orca most often. Orca are the largest of the dolphin family and definitely one of our favourite encounters. This November we have been blessed to have 4 encounters with the Brydes Whale, 3 with calf at side.

 

The Brydes Whales are the most commonly seen whale in the Northern waters of New Zealand and this month has proven so! Adults can grow up to 15meters in length and weigh up to 30 tonnes! Calves are generally 4-5meters when born and will stay with their mothers for 6-12 months until they are able to capture prey on their own. Brydes Whales are baleen whales meaning they have comb like teeth and they generally look for large swarms of prey and filter feed through the water, eating a variety of food from crustacea, cephlapods and fish.

They usually are solitary mammals travelling alone or in small groups throughout tropical and subtropical waters.

 

It truly was amazing to be able to encounter this magnificent whale and calf 3 tours in a row. We are so blessed in the Bay of Plenty to have marine life that sometimes stays for a week or more. It is difficult to describe the feeling of encountering a mother and calf whale right beside the boat allowing us to view them in their natural habitat.

 

Don’t get me wrong the dolphins are always incredible to experience in the wild however, we simply love the whale encounters. Here’s to an abundance of Orca and whales in December!

 

Join us for the experience of a lifetime.

 

Dolphin Finactic.

 

Tis the season

Written by Dolphin Finaddict on October 20th, 2016.      0 comments

Tis the season
It’s October and the first cruise ship, the magnificent Diamond princess has arrived, and you know what that means, Summer is just around the corner, and with it, brings warmer weather and sunshine. 


All of us at Dolphin Seafaris are anxiously awaiting our first trip of the season on October 22nd.  We will set out to fulfil dreams of encountering graceful, majestic dolphins in the beautiful Bay of Plenty.  On a typical dolphin tour, not only do we come across the Common Dolphins, but occasionally the playful Bottlenose, Orca, fur seals, Albatros, and other marine species. 
Our trips depart at 8 am and we also pick up from Salisbury Wharf at the Mount at 8.15.  Now you maybe wondering why so early?  Typically the wind and sea conditions are a lot better in the morning.  This is what helps us to get our awesome success rate or 90 plus percent.  We are the highest vessels in the Bay, which gives our spotters the best chance of finding the dolphins.  Yes, that’s right, we use good old fashion spotting, tracking on Gps, and a bit of luck and intuition to find these amazing creatures. 
We are very passionate about what we do and giving our customers the experience of a lifetime.  We love and respect these beautiful creatures, and the encounters are always on the Dolphins terms.  That’s what makes the Wild Encounter so precious and amazing.
It truly is incredible! Bring on October 22nd!
Warm regards,

Dolphin Finactic


 
 

Spectacular day out

Written by Dolphin Queen on February 29th, 2016.      0 comments

Amazing dolphin swim.
 

Grey-faced Petrel, Oi

Written by Dolphin Queen on October 12th, 2015.      0 comments

We just love our grey-faced petrels. Just watch out for the strong beaks ...
 

Very rare Southern Right whale

Written by Dolphin Queen on July 25th, 2015.      0 comments

We had a extra special whale visit the bay this week !!!
 

Record number of Humpback whales migrate past NZ !!!!!

Written by Dolphin Queen on July 13th, 2015.      0 comments

The 2015 Humpback whale survey has made a new record, 137 whales spotted !!! This is exciting for whale conservation everywhere
 

Incredible harbour visitors

Written by Dolphin Queen on June 23rd, 2015.      0 comments

An update on the beautiful marine species who visit us in Tauranga harbour.
 

The whales and Dolphins of the Bay of Plenty

Written by Dolphin Queen on February 14th, 2015.      0 comments

A Special blog for world whale day documenting the Whales we have seen over the last few seasons
 

What an amazing season! Dolphins, Pilot Whales, False killer Whales galore!

Written by Dolphin Queen on February 12th, 2015.      0 comments

An update on our sightings and happenings over the busy but incredible Christmas and New Year period.
 

Fighting the weather but amazing trips in between!

Written by Dolphin Queen on December 7th, 2014.      0 comments

Windy weather but some amazing trips in between! Awesome wildlife encounters and spectacular swims!
 

Great news for Dolphin Conservation!

Written by Dolphin Queen on November 12th, 2014.      0 comments

Dolphin Culture, what it is and how it is important for conservation...
 

The most incredible amazing start to the season. OMG!!!!

Written by Dolphin Queen on November 4th, 2014.      1 comments

 

The first weekend to the 2014/2015 season definitely went off with a bang and with the most varied and exciting species list I think we have ever encountered in one weekend! 

Saturday started with a young fur seal at Karewa Island and only got better! As happens sometimes, we had to go out very deep for our encounter and with a tip-off from the skipper of the Te Kuia from Blue Ocean Charters we headed out further than we had ever gone before, and boy was it worth it! A pod of around 80 Bottlenose Dolphins, accompanied by four Pilot Whales! 

Bottlenose are the stereotypical “Flipper” Dolphins, those that are often seen forced to perform tricks at marine parks such as SeaWorld, so to see them in the wild in such a large pod was fantastic and well worth the long trip. They are an endangered species in New Zealand waters so we rarely see them, and they had at least one young dolphin with them which was great to see and so special.

What made this encounter extra-special was the presence of the Pilot Whales, including a baby that still had the umbilical markings on its body indicating that it was less than three days old. 

The Dolphins and the Pilot Whales were feeding, alongside several Australasian Gannets and the most Albatross we have ever seen in one day on Dolphin Seafaris, at one point we counted over 20!

After the fantastic trip on Saturday, it was going to be a struggle for Sunday to match up, but boy did it! We headed straight out to sea after leaving the harbour, to get into the deep water again that proved so lucrative the day before. We soon came across a young Sunfish (Mola mola) wobbling it’s way around hunting for Jellyfish, followed by FIVE more inline, the glassy water allowing everyone to get a first class view of their awkward swimming technique. We could feel that it was going to be another awesome day and not long into the trip, another tip-off from a local fisherman lead us to back track back towards Karewa for something VERY special!

A pod of Orca! Four individuals, including a young one about a month old, heading towards the Mount and the harbour entrance! These guys were obviously feeding, surfacing two or three times for air before staying down for up to six minutes at a time, meaning everyone on the boat was on Orca watch when they were under. The whole boat was buzzing; this was such a special encounter with them being less than five metres from the boat at some points! After a while, they were joined by a further five individuals! NINE Orca! Again it was awesome to see such a majestic and intelligent animal in the wild and on their terms.

Many of our guests this weekend were locals, having won trips through the Tourism Bay of Plenty, it was awesome for us to show you guys around your own backyard and let you experience some of the most special experiences possible! Thank you so much for coming out and we would love to have you again bring your friends or family next time and let them experience it too!

If you were on the trips this weekend, ‘Like’ us on Facebook or share your stories and experiences on TripAdvisor. If you weren’t – Why not! Give us a call on +64 7 577 0105 or an email on bookings@nzdolphin.com to book and we’d love to have you on board!

 

 
Email me when new posts are made to this blog

Shark Myth Buster!

Written by Shark Girl on February 9th, 2017.      0 comments

We’ve been lucky enough to spot a number of blue sharks and hammerhead sharks in the last few weeks, so we thought we’d do some myth busting and see if we can make you love sharks like we do!

 

Hammerhead sharks, easily distinguishable by their unusual shaped head, might look scary, but they are actually big scaredy cats. They have no interest in us, and are way more likely to be more scared of us than we are of them. There have been zero reports of an attack on a human by a hammerhead shark, because it is practically impossible! The upside down U-shape of their mouth and its position underneath it’s head means that it wouldn’t be able to bite, let alone eat a human. Hammerheads are particularly partial to squid, rays, small fish, and small crustaceans. They tend to eat creatures that are around on the bottom of the ocean, explaining their mouth shape and position!

 

The shape of their head also is a massive help in finding their prey – all sharks have an incredibly advanced electrosensory system, which they use to detect movements and location of prey, temperature changes in the ocean, and they even use it as a form of navigation. This system is made up of pores mainly on their head and face, so having this system spread out further across the hammer shaped head, they can use this to their advantage to find food in the ocean floor easier and quicker. Having their eyes further apart is also a huge advantage, they have much better vision than most other sharks. They have almost 360-degree vertical vision, although they do have a blind spot directly in front of them, which is why they move their head side to side so much when they swim.

 

Even though they like to feed in deeper waters, we often see hammerhead sharks cruising along the surface, or in shallower waters. It’s thought that this is so they can warm up in the sun and the warmer shallow water, as they are cold-blooded creatures so can’t warm themselves up like we can. So when we spot them from the boat, they are just enjoying a nice bit of sunbathing.

 

We have also seen lots of blue sharks in the last few weeks, a smaller relative of the hammerhead. Blue sharks are, as you can probably guess, are a beautiful blue colour, and they have a long, pointy nose.

 

They also eat squid, small fish and crustaceans, but are also scavengers – they often eat fleshy remains of other animals in the water.  They have serrated teeth, making it easier to chew through large chunks of flesh, such as a dead whale body. They are a pelagic species, meaning they are constantly on the move through the water, swimming fairly close to the surface and feeding in deeper water.

 

It’s long nose and long pectoral fins means the blue shark is a mean swimmer, they can cover huge distances with minimal effort. They are migratory species, constantly on the move from coast to coast, mostly in tropical waters, but in the summer they tend to venture to cooler waters, where we get to see these beauties around the bay!

For the love of sharks!

- Shark Girl

 

Bringing in the New Year!

Written by Dolphin S on January 17th, 2017.      0 comments

What a way to bring in the new year!

Super pods, Orca, Brydes whales, Sunfish, and even turtles!

We’ve had it all this month at Dolphin Seafaris and hopefully this streak of luck will continue for the rest of the season!

Summer has shifted into gear and we are having one of the best seasons yet with this beautiful weather and dolphins for days!

The dolphins are always a favourite for us on our trips, but we have been so blessed the past few weeks to have numerous encounters with the sunfish or otherwise known as the Mola mola! It is the heaviest bony fish species in the world and their diet primarily consists of jellyfish! These fish can be as tall as they are long and their body is laterally compressed, they are found in both tropical and temperate waters around the world.

Not only have we had these incredible strange looking fish, we’ve always been blessed with turtles! Can you believe it!

On numerous occasions we have also had the rare encounter with the gigantic Leatherback Turtle! They can be found worldwide and found as north as Canada and down south to New Zealand and South America. They are able to maintain their warm body temperature even in the more temperate conditions, which is why they are able to survive in the cooler waters we get here in New Zealand.

These turtles aren’t your usual hard shell turtles; hence the name leather back, they have a thick leathery skin and are one of the deepest diving marine animals out there reaching depths of up to 1,200m! These turtles, like the sunfish also feed on large jellyfish!

We are crossing our fingers and toes that this magnificent season continues with plentiful encounters with the dolphins and any other marine life that wishes to grace us with their presence!

Join us in 2017 while the sun is shining and the water is warm for the experience of a lifetime!

 

Dolphin S

 

Merry Christmas!

Written by Dolphin S on December 27th, 2016.      0 comments

Merry Christmas!
 
The Holiday period has kicked off in full swing! The Bay of Plenty has been putting on a show for all our guests the past few weeks with this stunning weather, calm seas and plentiful array of marine life!
Over past few weeks the Common Dolphins have been entertaining our guests with their surfing skills, jumping ability and sometimes mating displays!
We’ve had some amazing encounters with pods of dolphins, sometimes we’ve even had pods with up to 300 dolphins!
 
Not only that, our fantastic whale month of November has continued and we’ve been blessed to experience the Brydes Whale again recently!
 
And to top that off an early Christmas present to all our crew and guests, we had 8 Orca grace us with their presence recently. What an absolutely incredible experience that was!
The Orca are the largest member of the Dolphin family, and can weight up to 3,600kgs!
Orcas are highly social animals and usually travel in pods of 5-30. They are found in most oceans around the world but are most common in the Arctic and Antarctic waters.
They are toothed whales and will feed on birds, turtles, sharks, fish, seals and squid.
Orca found in New Zealand are quite unique to the rest of the worlds populations as they feed on stingrays and will often be seen inside the Harbour chasing stings rays into shore!

thumb IMG 1039 1024-714 

December has been a great month for viewing and swimming with dolphins and it shall continue through into the New Year!
 
What better way to end 2016, or go into 2017 then with an experience to never forget!
 
Come join us!
 
Dolphin S
 

Whales O' Plenty

Written by dolphin Finatic on November 29th, 2016.      0 comments

Whales O' Plenty

 

We have had an absolutely fantastic start to the season. Typically, November is a great month to view Whales and this November has been no exception. 90+% of the time we encounter the common dolphins however, 10-12% of the time we are blessed to see whales! Predominately throughout the season we see Orca most often. Orca are the largest of the dolphin family and definitely one of our favourite encounters. This November we have been blessed to have 4 encounters with the Brydes Whale, 3 with calf at side.

 

The Brydes Whales are the most commonly seen whale in the Northern waters of New Zealand and this month has proven so! Adults can grow up to 15meters in length and weigh up to 30 tonnes! Calves are generally 4-5meters when born and will stay with their mothers for 6-12 months until they are able to capture prey on their own. Brydes Whales are baleen whales meaning they have comb like teeth and they generally look for large swarms of prey and filter feed through the water, eating a variety of food from crustacea, cephlapods and fish.

They usually are solitary mammals travelling alone or in small groups throughout tropical and subtropical waters.

 

It truly was amazing to be able to encounter this magnificent whale and calf 3 tours in a row. We are so blessed in the Bay of Plenty to have marine life that sometimes stays for a week or more. It is difficult to describe the feeling of encountering a mother and calf whale right beside the boat allowing us to view them in their natural habitat.

 

Don’t get me wrong the dolphins are always incredible to experience in the wild however, we simply love the whale encounters. Here’s to an abundance of Orca and whales in December!

 

Join us for the experience of a lifetime.

 

Dolphin Finactic.

 

Tis the season

Written by Dolphin Finaddict on October 20th, 2016.      0 comments

Tis the season
It’s October and the first cruise ship, the magnificent Diamond princess has arrived, and you know what that means, Summer is just around the corner, and with it, brings warmer weather and sunshine. 


All of us at Dolphin Seafaris are anxiously awaiting our first trip of the season on October 22nd.  We will set out to fulfil dreams of encountering graceful, majestic dolphins in the beautiful Bay of Plenty.  On a typical dolphin tour, not only do we come across the Common Dolphins, but occasionally the playful Bottlenose, Orca, fur seals, Albatros, and other marine species. 
Our trips depart at 8 am and we also pick up from Salisbury Wharf at the Mount at 8.15.  Now you maybe wondering why so early?  Typically the wind and sea conditions are a lot better in the morning.  This is what helps us to get our awesome success rate or 90 plus percent.  We are the highest vessels in the Bay, which gives our spotters the best chance of finding the dolphins.  Yes, that’s right, we use good old fashion spotting, tracking on Gps, and a bit of luck and intuition to find these amazing creatures. 
We are very passionate about what we do and giving our customers the experience of a lifetime.  We love and respect these beautiful creatures, and the encounters are always on the Dolphins terms.  That’s what makes the Wild Encounter so precious and amazing.
It truly is incredible! Bring on October 22nd!
Warm regards,

Dolphin Finactic


 
 

Spectacular day out

Written by Dolphin Queen on February 29th, 2016.      0 comments

Amazing dolphin swim.
 

Grey-faced Petrel, Oi

Written by Dolphin Queen on October 12th, 2015.      0 comments

We just love our grey-faced petrels. Just watch out for the strong beaks ...
 

Very rare Southern Right whale

Written by Dolphin Queen on July 25th, 2015.      0 comments

We had a extra special whale visit the bay this week !!!
 

Record number of Humpback whales migrate past NZ !!!!!

Written by Dolphin Queen on July 13th, 2015.      0 comments

The 2015 Humpback whale survey has made a new record, 137 whales spotted !!! This is exciting for whale conservation everywhere
 

Incredible harbour visitors

Written by Dolphin Queen on June 23rd, 2015.      0 comments

An update on the beautiful marine species who visit us in Tauranga harbour.
 

The whales and Dolphins of the Bay of Plenty

Written by Dolphin Queen on February 14th, 2015.      0 comments

A Special blog for world whale day documenting the Whales we have seen over the last few seasons
 

What an amazing season! Dolphins, Pilot Whales, False killer Whales galore!

Written by Dolphin Queen on February 12th, 2015.      0 comments

An update on our sightings and happenings over the busy but incredible Christmas and New Year period.
 

Fighting the weather but amazing trips in between!

Written by Dolphin Queen on December 7th, 2014.      0 comments

Windy weather but some amazing trips in between! Awesome wildlife encounters and spectacular swims!
 

Great news for Dolphin Conservation!

Written by Dolphin Queen on November 12th, 2014.      0 comments

Dolphin Culture, what it is and how it is important for conservation...
 

The most incredible amazing start to the season. OMG!!!!

Written by Dolphin Queen on November 4th, 2014.      1 comments

 

The first weekend to the 2014/2015 season definitely went off with a bang and with the most varied and exciting species list I think we have ever encountered in one weekend! 

Saturday started with a young fur seal at Karewa Island and only got better! As happens sometimes, we had to go out very deep for our encounter and with a tip-off from the skipper of the Te Kuia from Blue Ocean Charters we headed out further than we had ever gone before, and boy was it worth it! A pod of around 80 Bottlenose Dolphins, accompanied by four Pilot Whales! 

Bottlenose are the stereotypical “Flipper” Dolphins, those that are often seen forced to perform tricks at marine parks such as SeaWorld, so to see them in the wild in such a large pod was fantastic and well worth the long trip. They are an endangered species in New Zealand waters so we rarely see them, and they had at least one young dolphin with them which was great to see and so special.

What made this encounter extra-special was the presence of the Pilot Whales, including a baby that still had the umbilical markings on its body indicating that it was less than three days old. 

The Dolphins and the Pilot Whales were feeding, alongside several Australasian Gannets and the most Albatross we have ever seen in one day on Dolphin Seafaris, at one point we counted over 20!

After the fantastic trip on Saturday, it was going to be a struggle for Sunday to match up, but boy did it! We headed straight out to sea after leaving the harbour, to get into the deep water again that proved so lucrative the day before. We soon came across a young Sunfish (Mola mola) wobbling it’s way around hunting for Jellyfish, followed by FIVE more inline, the glassy water allowing everyone to get a first class view of their awkward swimming technique. We could feel that it was going to be another awesome day and not long into the trip, another tip-off from a local fisherman lead us to back track back towards Karewa for something VERY special!

A pod of Orca! Four individuals, including a young one about a month old, heading towards the Mount and the harbour entrance! These guys were obviously feeding, surfacing two or three times for air before staying down for up to six minutes at a time, meaning everyone on the boat was on Orca watch when they were under. The whole boat was buzzing; this was such a special encounter with them being less than five metres from the boat at some points! After a while, they were joined by a further five individuals! NINE Orca! Again it was awesome to see such a majestic and intelligent animal in the wild and on their terms.

Many of our guests this weekend were locals, having won trips through the Tourism Bay of Plenty, it was awesome for us to show you guys around your own backyard and let you experience some of the most special experiences possible! Thank you so much for coming out and we would love to have you again bring your friends or family next time and let them experience it too!

If you were on the trips this weekend, ‘Like’ us on Facebook or share your stories and experiences on TripAdvisor. If you weren’t – Why not! Give us a call on +64 7 577 0105 or an email on bookings@nzdolphin.com to book and we’d love to have you on board!

 

 
Email me when new posts are made to this blog

Shark Myth Buster!

Written by Shark Girl on February 9th, 2017.      0 comments

We’ve been lucky enough to spot a number of blue sharks and hammerhead sharks in the last few weeks, so we thought we’d do some myth busting and see if we can make you love sharks like we do!

 

Hammerhead sharks, easily distinguishable by their unusual shaped head, might look scary, but they are actually big scaredy cats. They have no interest in us, and are way more likely to be more scared of us than we are of them. There have been zero reports of an attack on a human by a hammerhead shark, because it is practically impossible! The upside down U-shape of their mouth and its position underneath it’s head means that it wouldn’t be able to bite, let alone eat a human. Hammerheads are particularly partial to squid, rays, small fish, and small crustaceans. They tend to eat creatures that are around on the bottom of the ocean, explaining their mouth shape and position!

 

The shape of their head also is a massive help in finding their prey – all sharks have an incredibly advanced electrosensory system, which they use to detect movements and location of prey, temperature changes in the ocean, and they even use it as a form of navigation. This system is made up of pores mainly on their head and face, so having this system spread out further across the hammer shaped head, they can use this to their advantage to find food in the ocean floor easier and quicker. Having their eyes further apart is also a huge advantage, they have much better vision than most other sharks. They have almost 360-degree vertical vision, although they do have a blind spot directly in front of them, which is why they move their head side to side so much when they swim.

 

Even though they like to feed in deeper waters, we often see hammerhead sharks cruising along the surface, or in shallower waters. It’s thought that this is so they can warm up in the sun and the warmer shallow water, as they are cold-blooded creatures so can’t warm themselves up like we can. So when we spot them from the boat, they are just enjoying a nice bit of sunbathing.

 

We have also seen lots of blue sharks in the last few weeks, a smaller relative of the hammerhead. Blue sharks are, as you can probably guess, are a beautiful blue colour, and they have a long, pointy nose.

 

They also eat squid, small fish and crustaceans, but are also scavengers – they often eat fleshy remains of other animals in the water.  They have serrated teeth, making it easier to chew through large chunks of flesh, such as a dead whale body. They are a pelagic species, meaning they are constantly on the move through the water, swimming fairly close to the surface and feeding in deeper water.

 

It’s long nose and long pectoral fins means the blue shark is a mean swimmer, they can cover huge distances with minimal effort. They are migratory species, constantly on the move from coast to coast, mostly in tropical waters, but in the summer they tend to venture to cooler waters, where we get to see these beauties around the bay!

For the love of sharks!

- Shark Girl

 

Bringing in the New Year!

Written by Dolphin S on January 17th, 2017.      0 comments

What a way to bring in the new year!

Super pods, Orca, Brydes whales, Sunfish, and even turtles!

We’ve had it all this month at Dolphin Seafaris and hopefully this streak of luck will continue for the rest of the season!

Summer has shifted into gear and we are having one of the best seasons yet with this beautiful weather and dolphins for days!

The dolphins are always a favourite for us on our trips, but we have been so blessed the past few weeks to have numerous encounters with the sunfish or otherwise known as the Mola mola! It is the heaviest bony fish species in the world and their diet primarily consists of jellyfish! These fish can be as tall as they are long and their body is laterally compressed, they are found in both tropical and temperate waters around the world.

Not only have we had these incredible strange looking fish, we’ve always been blessed with turtles! Can you believe it!

On numerous occasions we have also had the rare encounter with the gigantic Leatherback Turtle! They can be found worldwide and found as north as Canada and down south to New Zealand and South America. They are able to maintain their warm body temperature even in the more temperate conditions, which is why they are able to survive in the cooler waters we get here in New Zealand.

These turtles aren’t your usual hard shell turtles; hence the name leather back, they have a thick leathery skin and are one of the deepest diving marine animals out there reaching depths of up to 1,200m! These turtles, like the sunfish also feed on large jellyfish!

We are crossing our fingers and toes that this magnificent season continues with plentiful encounters with the dolphins and any other marine life that wishes to grace us with their presence!

Join us in 2017 while the sun is shining and the water is warm for the experience of a lifetime!

 

Dolphin S

 

Merry Christmas!

Written by Dolphin S on December 27th, 2016.      0 comments

Merry Christmas!
 
The Holiday period has kicked off in full swing! The Bay of Plenty has been putting on a show for all our guests the past few weeks with this stunning weather, calm seas and plentiful array of marine life!
Over past few weeks the Common Dolphins have been entertaining our guests with their surfing skills, jumping ability and sometimes mating displays!
We’ve had some amazing encounters with pods of dolphins, sometimes we’ve even had pods with up to 300 dolphins!
 
Not only that, our fantastic whale month of November has continued and we’ve been blessed to experience the Brydes Whale again recently!
 
And to top that off an early Christmas present to all our crew and guests, we had 8 Orca grace us with their presence recently. What an absolutely incredible experience that was!
The Orca are the largest member of the Dolphin family, and can weight up to 3,600kgs!
Orcas are highly social animals and usually travel in pods of 5-30. They are found in most oceans around the world but are most common in the Arctic and Antarctic waters.
They are toothed whales and will feed on birds, turtles, sharks, fish, seals and squid.
Orca found in New Zealand are quite unique to the rest of the worlds populations as they feed on stingrays and will often be seen inside the Harbour chasing stings rays into shore!

thumb IMG 1039 1024-714 

December has been a great month for viewing and swimming with dolphins and it shall continue through into the New Year!
 
What better way to end 2016, or go into 2017 then with an experience to never forget!
 
Come join us!
 
Dolphin S
 

Whales O' Plenty

Written by dolphin Finatic on November 29th, 2016.      0 comments

Whales O' Plenty

 

We have had an absolutely fantastic start to the season. Typically, November is a great month to view Whales and this November has been no exception. 90+% of the time we encounter the common dolphins however, 10-12% of the time we are blessed to see whales! Predominately throughout the season we see Orca most often. Orca are the largest of the dolphin family and definitely one of our favourite encounters. This November we have been blessed to have 4 encounters with the Brydes Whale, 3 with calf at side.

 

The Brydes Whales are the most commonly seen whale in the Northern waters of New Zealand and this month has proven so! Adults can grow up to 15meters in length and weigh up to 30 tonnes! Calves are generally 4-5meters when born and will stay with their mothers for 6-12 months until they are able to capture prey on their own. Brydes Whales are baleen whales meaning they have comb like teeth and they generally look for large swarms of prey and filter feed through the water, eating a variety of food from crustacea, cephlapods and fish.

They usually are solitary mammals travelling alone or in small groups throughout tropical and subtropical waters.

 

It truly was amazing to be able to encounter this magnificent whale and calf 3 tours in a row. We are so blessed in the Bay of Plenty to have marine life that sometimes stays for a week or more. It is difficult to describe the feeling of encountering a mother and calf whale right beside the boat allowing us to view them in their natural habitat.

 

Don’t get me wrong the dolphins are always incredible to experience in the wild however, we simply love the whale encounters. Here’s to an abundance of Orca and whales in December!

 

Join us for the experience of a lifetime.

 

Dolphin Finactic.

 

Tis the season

Written by Dolphin Finaddict on October 20th, 2016.      0 comments

Tis the season
It’s October and the first cruise ship, the magnificent Diamond princess has arrived, and you know what that means, Summer is just around the corner, and with it, brings warmer weather and sunshine. 


All of us at Dolphin Seafaris are anxiously awaiting our first trip of the season on October 22nd.  We will set out to fulfil dreams of encountering graceful, majestic dolphins in the beautiful Bay of Plenty.  On a typical dolphin tour, not only do we come across the Common Dolphins, but occasionally the playful Bottlenose, Orca, fur seals, Albatros, and other marine species. 
Our trips depart at 8 am and we also pick up from Salisbury Wharf at the Mount at 8.15.  Now you maybe wondering why so early?  Typically the wind and sea conditions are a lot better in the morning.  This is what helps us to get our awesome success rate or 90 plus percent.  We are the highest vessels in the Bay, which gives our spotters the best chance of finding the dolphins.  Yes, that’s right, we use good old fashion spotting, tracking on Gps, and a bit of luck and intuition to find these amazing creatures. 
We are very passionate about what we do and giving our customers the experience of a lifetime.  We love and respect these beautiful creatures, and the encounters are always on the Dolphins terms.  That’s what makes the Wild Encounter so precious and amazing.
It truly is incredible! Bring on October 22nd!
Warm regards,

Dolphin Finactic


 
 

Spectacular day out

Written by Dolphin Queen on February 29th, 2016.      0 comments

Amazing dolphin swim.
 

Grey-faced Petrel, Oi

Written by Dolphin Queen on October 12th, 2015.      0 comments

We just love our grey-faced petrels. Just watch out for the strong beaks ...
 

Very rare Southern Right whale

Written by Dolphin Queen on July 25th, 2015.      0 comments

We had a extra special whale visit the bay this week !!!
 

Record number of Humpback whales migrate past NZ !!!!!

Written by Dolphin Queen on July 13th, 2015.      0 comments

The 2015 Humpback whale survey has made a new record, 137 whales spotted !!! This is exciting for whale conservation everywhere
 

Incredible harbour visitors

Written by Dolphin Queen on June 23rd, 2015.      0 comments

An update on the beautiful marine species who visit us in Tauranga harbour.
 

The whales and Dolphins of the Bay of Plenty

Written by Dolphin Queen on February 14th, 2015.      0 comments

A Special blog for world whale day documenting the Whales we have seen over the last few seasons
 

What an amazing season! Dolphins, Pilot Whales, False killer Whales galore!

Written by Dolphin Queen on February 12th, 2015.      0 comments

An update on our sightings and happenings over the busy but incredible Christmas and New Year period.
 

Fighting the weather but amazing trips in between!

Written by Dolphin Queen on December 7th, 2014.      0 comments

Windy weather but some amazing trips in between! Awesome wildlife encounters and spectacular swims!
 

Great news for Dolphin Conservation!

Written by Dolphin Queen on November 12th, 2014.      0 comments

Dolphin Culture, what it is and how it is important for conservation...
 

The most incredible amazing start to the season. OMG!!!!

Written by Dolphin Queen on November 4th, 2014.      1 comments

 

The first weekend to the 2014/2015 season definitely went off with a bang and with the most varied and exciting species list I think we have ever encountered in one weekend! 

Saturday started with a young fur seal at Karewa Island and only got better! As happens sometimes, we had to go out very deep for our encounter and with a tip-off from the skipper of the Te Kuia from Blue Ocean Charters we headed out further than we had ever gone before, and boy was it worth it! A pod of around 80 Bottlenose Dolphins, accompanied by four Pilot Whales! 

Bottlenose are the stereotypical “Flipper” Dolphins, those that are often seen forced to perform tricks at marine parks such as SeaWorld, so to see them in the wild in such a large pod was fantastic and well worth the long trip. They are an endangered species in New Zealand waters so we rarely see them, and they had at least one young dolphin with them which was great to see and so special.

What made this encounter extra-special was the presence of the Pilot Whales, including a baby that still had the umbilical markings on its body indicating that it was less than three days old. 

The Dolphins and the Pilot Whales were feeding, alongside several Australasian Gannets and the most Albatross we have ever seen in one day on Dolphin Seafaris, at one point we counted over 20!

After the fantastic trip on Saturday, it was going to be a struggle for Sunday to match up, but boy did it! We headed straight out to sea after leaving the harbour, to get into the deep water again that proved so lucrative the day before. We soon came across a young Sunfish (Mola mola) wobbling it’s way around hunting for Jellyfish, followed by FIVE more inline, the glassy water allowing everyone to get a first class view of their awkward swimming technique. We could feel that it was going to be another awesome day and not long into the trip, another tip-off from a local fisherman lead us to back track back towards Karewa for something VERY special!

A pod of Orca! Four individuals, including a young one about a month old, heading towards the Mount and the harbour entrance! These guys were obviously feeding, surfacing two or three times for air before staying down for up to six minutes at a time, meaning everyone on the boat was on Orca watch when they were under. The whole boat was buzzing; this was such a special encounter with them being less than five metres from the boat at some points! After a while, they were joined by a further five individuals! NINE Orca! Again it was awesome to see such a majestic and intelligent animal in the wild and on their terms.

Many of our guests this weekend were locals, having won trips through the Tourism Bay of Plenty, it was awesome for us to show you guys around your own backyard and let you experience some of the most special experiences possible! Thank you so much for coming out and we would love to have you again bring your friends or family next time and let them experience it too!

If you were on the trips this weekend, ‘Like’ us on Facebook or share your stories and experiences on TripAdvisor. If you weren’t – Why not! Give us a call on +64 7 577 0105 or an email on bookings@nzdolphin.com to book and we’d love to have you on board!

 

 
Email me when new posts are made to this blog

Shark Myth Buster!

Written by Shark Girl on February 9th, 2017.      0 comments

We’ve been lucky enough to spot a number of blue sharks and hammerhead sharks in the last few weeks, so we thought we’d do some myth busting and see if we can make you love sharks like we do!

 

Hammerhead sharks, easily distinguishable by their unusual shaped head, might look scary, but they are actually big scaredy cats. They have no interest in us, and are way more likely to be more scared of us than we are of them. There have been zero reports of an attack on a human by a hammerhead shark, because it is practically impossible! The upside down U-shape of their mouth and its position underneath it’s head means that it wouldn’t be able to bite, let alone eat a human. Hammerheads are particularly partial to squid, rays, small fish, and small crustaceans. They tend to eat creatures that are around on the bottom of the ocean, explaining their mouth shape and position!

 

The shape of their head also is a massive help in finding their prey – all sharks have an incredibly advanced electrosensory system, which they use to detect movements and location of prey, temperature changes in the ocean, and they even use it as a form of navigation. This system is made up of pores mainly on their head and face, so having this system spread out further across the hammer shaped head, they can use this to their advantage to find food in the ocean floor easier and quicker. Having their eyes further apart is also a huge advantage, they have much better vision than most other sharks. They have almost 360-degree vertical vision, although they do have a blind spot directly in front of them, which is why they move their head side to side so much when they swim.

 

Even though they like to feed in deeper waters, we often see hammerhead sharks cruising along the surface, or in shallower waters. It’s thought that this is so they can warm up in the sun and the warmer shallow water, as they are cold-blooded creatures so can’t warm themselves up like we can. So when we spot them from the boat, they are just enjoying a nice bit of sunbathing.

 

We have also seen lots of blue sharks in the last few weeks, a smaller relative of the hammerhead. Blue sharks are, as you can probably guess, are a beautiful blue colour, and they have a long, pointy nose.

 

They also eat squid, small fish and crustaceans, but are also scavengers – they often eat fleshy remains of other animals in the water.  They have serrated teeth, making it easier to chew through large chunks of flesh, such as a dead whale body. They are a pelagic species, meaning they are constantly on the move through the water, swimming fairly close to the surface and feeding in deeper water.

 

It’s long nose and long pectoral fins means the blue shark is a mean swimmer, they can cover huge distances with minimal effort. They are migratory species, constantly on the move from coast to coast, mostly in tropical waters, but in the summer they tend to venture to cooler waters, where we get to see these beauties around the bay!

For the love of sharks!

- Shark Girl

 

Bringing in the New Year!

Written by Dolphin S on January 17th, 2017.      0 comments

What a way to bring in the new year!

Super pods, Orca, Brydes whales, Sunfish, and even turtles!

We’ve had it all this month at Dolphin Seafaris and hopefully this streak of luck will continue for the rest of the season!

Summer has shifted into gear and we are having one of the best seasons yet with this beautiful weather and dolphins for days!

The dolphins are always a favourite for us on our trips, but we have been so blessed the past few weeks to have numerous encounters with the sunfish or otherwise known as the Mola mola! It is the heaviest bony fish species in the world and their diet primarily consists of jellyfish! These fish can be as tall as they are long and their body is laterally compressed, they are found in both tropical and temperate waters around the world.

Not only have we had these incredible strange looking fish, we’ve always been blessed with turtles! Can you believe it!

On numerous occasions we have also had the rare encounter with the gigantic Leatherback Turtle! They can be found worldwide and found as north as Canada and down south to New Zealand and South America. They are able to maintain their warm body temperature even in the more temperate conditions, which is why they are able to survive in the cooler waters we get here in New Zealand.

These turtles aren’t your usual hard shell turtles; hence the name leather back, they have a thick leathery skin and are one of the deepest diving marine animals out there reaching depths of up to 1,200m! These turtles, like the sunfish also feed on large jellyfish!

We are crossing our fingers and toes that this magnificent season continues with plentiful encounters with the dolphins and any other marine life that wishes to grace us with their presence!

Join us in 2017 while the sun is shining and the water is warm for the experience of a lifetime!

 

Dolphin S

 

Merry Christmas!

Written by Dolphin S on December 27th, 2016.      0 comments

Merry Christmas!
 
The Holiday period has kicked off in full swing! The Bay of Plenty has been putting on a show for all our guests the past few weeks with this stunning weather, calm seas and plentiful array of marine life!
Over past few weeks the Common Dolphins have been entertaining our guests with their surfing skills, jumping ability and sometimes mating displays!
We’ve had some amazing encounters with pods of dolphins, sometimes we’ve even had pods with up to 300 dolphins!
 
Not only that, our fantastic whale month of November has continued and we’ve been blessed to experience the Brydes Whale again recently!
 
And to top that off an early Christmas present to all our crew and guests, we had 8 Orca grace us with their presence recently. What an absolutely incredible experience that was!
The Orca are the largest member of the Dolphin family, and can weight up to 3,600kgs!
Orcas are highly social animals and usually travel in pods of 5-30. They are found in most oceans around the world but are most common in the Arctic and Antarctic waters.
They are toothed whales and will feed on birds, turtles, sharks, fish, seals and squid.
Orca found in New Zealand are quite unique to the rest of the worlds populations as they feed on stingrays and will often be seen inside the Harbour chasing stings rays into shore!

thumb IMG 1039 1024-714 

December has been a great month for viewing and swimming with dolphins and it shall continue through into the New Year!
 
What better way to end 2016, or go into 2017 then with an experience to never forget!
 
Come join us!
 
Dolphin S
 

Whales O' Plenty

Written by dolphin Finatic on November 29th, 2016.      0 comments

Whales O' Plenty

 

We have had an absolutely fantastic start to the season. Typically, November is a great month to view Whales and this November has been no exception. 90+% of the time we encounter the common dolphins however, 10-12% of the time we are blessed to see whales! Predominately throughout the season we see Orca most often. Orca are the largest of the dolphin family and definitely one of our favourite encounters. This November we have been blessed to have 4 encounters with the Brydes Whale, 3 with calf at side.

 

The Brydes Whales are the most commonly seen whale in the Northern waters of New Zealand and this month has proven so! Adults can grow up to 15meters in length and weigh up to 30 tonnes! Calves are generally 4-5meters when born and will stay with their mothers for 6-12 months until they are able to capture prey on their own. Brydes Whales are baleen whales meaning they have comb like teeth and they generally look for large swarms of prey and filter feed through the water, eating a variety of food from crustacea, cephlapods and fish.

They usually are solitary mammals travelling alone or in small groups throughout tropical and subtropical waters.

 

It truly was amazing to be able to encounter this magnificent whale and calf 3 tours in a row. We are so blessed in the Bay of Plenty to have marine life that sometimes stays for a week or more. It is difficult to describe the feeling of encountering a mother and calf whale right beside the boat allowing us to view them in their natural habitat.

 

Don’t get me wrong the dolphins are always incredible to experience in the wild however, we simply love the whale encounters. Here’s to an abundance of Orca and whales in December!

 

Join us for the experience of a lifetime.

 

Dolphin Finactic.

 

Tis the season

Written by Dolphin Finaddict on October 20th, 2016.      0 comments

Tis the season
It’s October and the first cruise ship, the magnificent Diamond princess has arrived, and you know what that means, Summer is just around the corner, and with it, brings warmer weather and sunshine. 


All of us at Dolphin Seafaris are anxiously awaiting our first trip of the season on October 22nd.  We will set out to fulfil dreams of encountering graceful, majestic dolphins in the beautiful Bay of Plenty.  On a typical dolphin tour, not only do we come across the Common Dolphins, but occasionally the playful Bottlenose, Orca, fur seals, Albatros, and other marine species. 
Our trips depart at 8 am and we also pick up from Salisbury Wharf at the Mount at 8.15.  Now you maybe wondering why so early?  Typically the wind and sea conditions are a lot better in the morning.  This is what helps us to get our awesome success rate or 90 plus percent.  We are the highest vessels in the Bay, which gives our spotters the best chance of finding the dolphins.  Yes, that’s right, we use good old fashion spotting, tracking on Gps, and a bit of luck and intuition to find these amazing creatures. 
We are very passionate about what we do and giving our customers the experience of a lifetime.  We love and respect these beautiful creatures, and the encounters are always on the Dolphins terms.  That’s what makes the Wild Encounter so precious and amazing.
It truly is incredible! Bring on October 22nd!
Warm regards,

Dolphin Finactic


 
 

Spectacular day out

Written by Dolphin Queen on February 29th, 2016.      0 comments

Amazing dolphin swim.
 

Grey-faced Petrel, Oi

Written by Dolphin Queen on October 12th, 2015.      0 comments

We just love our grey-faced petrels. Just watch out for the strong beaks ...
 

Very rare Southern Right whale

Written by Dolphin Queen on July 25th, 2015.      0 comments

We had a extra special whale visit the bay this week !!!
 

Record number of Humpback whales migrate past NZ !!!!!

Written by Dolphin Queen on July 13th, 2015.      0 comments

The 2015 Humpback whale survey has made a new record, 137 whales spotted !!! This is exciting for whale conservation everywhere
 

Incredible harbour visitors

Written by Dolphin Queen on June 23rd, 2015.      0 comments

An update on the beautiful marine species who visit us in Tauranga harbour.
 

The whales and Dolphins of the Bay of Plenty

Written by Dolphin Queen on February 14th, 2015.      0 comments

A Special blog for world whale day documenting the Whales we have seen over the last few seasons
 

What an amazing season! Dolphins, Pilot Whales, False killer Whales galore!

Written by Dolphin Queen on February 12th, 2015.      0 comments

An update on our sightings and happenings over the busy but incredible Christmas and New Year period.
 

Fighting the weather but amazing trips in between!

Written by Dolphin Queen on December 7th, 2014.      0 comments

Windy weather but some amazing trips in between! Awesome wildlife encounters and spectacular swims!
 

Great news for Dolphin Conservation!

Written by Dolphin Queen on November 12th, 2014.      0 comments

Dolphin Culture, what it is and how it is important for conservation...
 

The most incredible amazing start to the season. OMG!!!!

Written by Dolphin Queen on November 4th, 2014.      1 comments

 

The first weekend to the 2014/2015 season definitely went off with a bang and with the most varied and exciting species list I think we have ever encountered in one weekend! 

Saturday started with a young fur seal at Karewa Island and only got better! As happens sometimes, we had to go out very deep for our encounter and with a tip-off from the skipper of the Te Kuia from Blue Ocean Charters we headed out further than we had ever gone before, and boy was it worth it! A pod of around 80 Bottlenose Dolphins, accompanied by four Pilot Whales! 

Bottlenose are the stereotypical “Flipper” Dolphins, those that are often seen forced to perform tricks at marine parks such as SeaWorld, so to see them in the wild in such a large pod was fantastic and well worth the long trip. They are an endangered species in New Zealand waters so we rarely see them, and they had at least one young dolphin with them which was great to see and so special.

What made this encounter extra-special was the presence of the Pilot Whales, including a baby that still had the umbilical markings on its body indicating that it was less than three days old. 

The Dolphins and the Pilot Whales were feeding, alongside several Australasian Gannets and the most Albatross we have ever seen in one day on Dolphin Seafaris, at one point we counted over 20!

After the fantastic trip on Saturday, it was going to be a struggle for Sunday to match up, but boy did it! We headed straight out to sea after leaving the harbour, to get into the deep water again that proved so lucrative the day before. We soon came across a young Sunfish (Mola mola) wobbling it’s way around hunting for Jellyfish, followed by FIVE more inline, the glassy water allowing everyone to get a first class view of their awkward swimming technique. We could feel that it was going to be another awesome day and not long into the trip, another tip-off from a local fisherman lead us to back track back towards Karewa for something VERY special!

A pod of Orca! Four individuals, including a young one about a month old, heading towards the Mount and the harbour entrance! These guys were obviously feeding, surfacing two or three times for air before staying down for up to six minutes at a time, meaning everyone on the boat was on Orca watch when they were under. The whole boat was buzzing; this was such a special encounter with them being less than five metres from the boat at some points! After a while, they were joined by a further five individuals! NINE Orca! Again it was awesome to see such a majestic and intelligent animal in the wild and on their terms.

Many of our guests this weekend were locals, having won trips through the Tourism Bay of Plenty, it was awesome for us to show you guys around your own backyard and let you experience some of the most special experiences possible! Thank you so much for coming out and we would love to have you again bring your friends or family next time and let them experience it too!

If you were on the trips this weekend, ‘Like’ us on Facebook or share your stories and experiences on TripAdvisor. If you weren’t – Why not! Give us a call on +64 7 577 0105 or an email on bookings@nzdolphin.com to book and we’d love to have you on board!

 

 

About Dolphin Seafaris

We are a passionate team who love all marine life, especially dolphins, and enjoy educating our customers about dolphins and marine life. With many years of working with marine animals and a high success rate of locating dolphins, Dolphin Seafaris will give you the dolphin tour of a life time. 

Read more
 

Contact Us

0800 ECO TRIP 
(0800 326 8747)

0064 7 577 0105
bookings@nzdolphin.com